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Saturday, August 24, 2013

Recruiting

Business is a tough world. Small companies like us start, struggle and fail every day. Meeting deadlines, making payroll, and staying on top of the competition are just a few pressures that weigh on entrepreneurs every day. Under such stress, it's easy to lose objectivity and become stubborn or even selfish. After all, isn't business all about making money? Not quite imho.

Do I want to make a ton of money? Yes, of course. But I think that cutting corners is not my way to do so. At the end of the day, businesses are run by people. Whether it's an investor, a user, or an employee, he/she has emotions, financial needs, families to take care of. Recognizing their priorities helps me better understand why they would want to be part of my business to start with. It helps me focus on long-term sustainability of the team/relationship instead of on my immediate need to get things done. 

People have talents and ambitions. As a leader, I believe it is my job to ensure that I help my team members achieve personal success. This also applies to potential employees. If someone offered them something better suited to their needs, I would not try to persuade them that I have the better offer. I think that being honest about one's shortcomings is important in building trust. Trust is not only needed at the consumer/user level, but throughout the organization. If I can't inspire trust from my team, how can I expect trust from my customers in the long run?

The first manager I had always used to ask "what can I do for you?"
That phrase set an impression on me. I felt that he was approachable and supportive.
My second manager said "If people are happy, they'll stay", emphasizing that work should be rewarding and enjoyable.

So my philosophy about employees  is the following:
My job is to keep you happy with the job. Your job is to keep me happy with your job.

It's still too early to tell whether this the good strategy but let me know if you disagree. What is your philosophy on hiring?